Institutional Hours for General Education

Dear Colleagues,

The list below are the courses that the faculty have compiled with regards to the institutional hours of General Education. The CCC will review the survey results,  blog feedback, completed Gen Ed templates, course outlines, and assessment plans to make decisions regarding our General Education hours for the 2015/2016 academic year.  The CCC will vote on the institutional hours at its November 13 meeting, West campus, 6-202 from 2-5.

Communications: ENC 1102, Freshman Composition II

Humanities:  HUM 2220, Greek and Roman (Gordon Rule);  HUM 2223, Late Roman and Medieval (Gordon Rule); HUM 2232, Renaissance and Baroque (Gordon Rule); HUM 2234, Enlightenment and Romanticism (Gordon Rule), HUM 2250, Twentieth Century (Gordon Rule), HUM 2310, Mythology (Gordon Rule), PHI 2600, Ethics and Critical Thinking (Gordon Rule); HUM 2410, Asian Humanities (Gordon Rule), HUM 2461 Latin-American Humanities (Gordon Rule), ARH 2051, Introduction to Art History II (Gordon Rule); REL 2000 Understanding Religious Traditions (Gordon Rule), ARC 1701, History of Architecture (Gordon Rule), and MUT 1111 (not Gordon Rule, music majors will take the MUL 1110 as the Gordon Rule which is in the core)

MathMAC 1114, College Trigonometry; MAC 1140, Precalculus Algebra; MAC 2233 Calculus for Business, and MAC 2312, Calculus with Analytical Geometry II

Science:  BOT2010C, Botany; BOT 2800, Ethnobotany; BSC1011C, Fundamentals of Biology II;  BSC1020/1020C, Human Biology; BSC1026, Biology of Human Sexuality; BSC2093C, Human Anatomy and Physiology I; BSC2094C, Human Anatomy and Physiology II;   MCB2010C, Microbiology; OCB1000, Intro to Marine Biology; PCB2340, Field Biology;  PCB2350, Neotropical Biology; CHM1025C, Intro to General Chemistry; CHM1046C, General Chemistry; CHM1205C, Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry; CHM2210C, Organic Chemistry I; CHM2211C, Organic Chemistry II; GLY2010C,  Physical Geology; GLY2100C, Historical Geology; GLY2163, Geology of National Parks; MET1010, Intro to Meteorology;   OCE1001, Introduction to Oceanography; PHY1007C, Physics with Medical Applications; PHY2054C, Introduction to Physics II; PHY2049C, Physics with Calculus II

Social Science: AMH 2010, U.S. History to 1877; ECO 2023 Principles of Economics-Micro; EUH 2000, Ancient and Medievel Western Civilization (Gordon Rule); EUH 2001, Modern Western Civilization (Gordon Rule); INR 2002, International Politics (Gordon Rule); POS 2112, State and Local Politics (now Gordon Rule)


5 Responses to “Institutional Hours for General Education”

  1. Kristol Bell

    I have a concern/observation. I notice that under Humanities, Latin American and Asian Humanities are listed but not African-American Humanities. Why is this? I am disappointed in not seeing African-American Humanities. Does not seem equitable in my humble opinion.

    Reply
  2. Karen Marie Borglum

    The Humanities faculty did not have a credentialed full-time faculty member who teaches this course. The outline was unable to be completed by the adjunct faculty member, and so it was not submitted.

    Reply
  3. Karen Marie Borglum

    Dear colleagues,

    Here are the comments for the Institutional Hours of Gen Ed. They have not been modified in any way.

    I thought DEP 2004 was approved by the last meeting

    None

    Many more students would benefit from PHI course instead of MUT 1111

    If a course that is not in Gen Ed is no longer Gordon Rule, we are doing our students a disservice by offering only 3 Gordon Rule choices in the Social Sciences bucket. A student will now be able to complete the Gen Ed core without completing the Gordon Rule, and there was gnashing of teeth at the “extra hours” a student might incur as a result.

    it is strange to not see religion or US government on any of these lists now that i see the lists in their entirety.

    I taught a class mid-day on Fridays this semester which kept me from attending most GE meetings.

    I am worried about the choices for Gordon Rule social science classes. Some majors have little or no free electives that can be used to also meet the GR writing requirement. If a major has two specific social science classes that are not one of the GR classes then a student may be forced into extra hours. I think more GR options should be available.

    I’ve attended parts of different sessions in different disciplines, so more accurate than ‘I have no opinion’ would be that I haven’t been in any one meeting enough to weigh in, but I support the process used to come to these decisions and trust my colleagues in general education who made them.

    Humanities people are insisting on too many classes for Gen Ed. The inclusion of Asian-American and Latin-American is particularly egregious, as those classes are narrowly focused, thus not meeting the Gen Ed principle of breadth. Considering English gave up any claim on Gen Ed courses in humanities for the time being, the insistence on including every humanities course in the world in Gen Ed is a bit galling.

    This is quite a long list of science classes. We were looking to pare down choices and it doesn’t look like that has happened in the science area.

    Both Science and Humanities have put forward courses that do not meet the ’boutique course’ principle.

    Thank you for all your amazing work with this design change.

    Not sure I understand the math or social sciences does that mean those are the only courses? Or additional choices if additional then I change to yes

    A formalized process needs to be developed for faculty to use to consider adding/removing classes from Gen Ed in the future.

    Stats should be in the Math offering – perhaps it is already but if not, it should be.

    I am concerned about the distribution of culture-specific humanities classes. If Asian and Latin American Humanities are included, then African American and Middle Eastern Humanities should be included as well. The current course list does not present Valencia as inclusive and diverse, and it really seems to limit the scope of the “Cultural and Historical Understanding” outcome.

    Reply
  4. Yasmeen Qadri

    Of particular interest to me is the Humanities Discipline. In response to the following comments: “If Asian and Latin American Humanities are included, then African American and Middle Eastern Humanities should be included as well. The current course list does not present Valencia as inclusive and diverse, and it really seems to limit the scope of the “Cultural and Historical Understanding”. “The inclusion of Asian-American and Latin-American is particularly egregious, as those classes are narrowly focused, thus not meeting the Gen Ed principle of breadth”.

    The narrowly focused or lack of in depth teaching should not be a factor for us to determine if that course should be omitted or included. This opens up another serious conversation and this may not be the focus of this blog! Asian and Middle Eastern Humanities should be taken seriously if we are to prepare our students as global and informed citizens. The current affairs in the world are focused on these two areas—- be it economical, political, or religious, keeping our students ignorant will not only be a disservice to them but to a nation and the world! With Valencia College’s new partnership in Riyadh and Study Abroad student and faculty interest in the Middle East, Malaysia, and India, should have a prominent place in Humanities.

    Reply
  5. Yasmeen Qadri

    Correction requested: Asian and Middle Eastern Studies should have a prominent place in Humanities.

    Reply

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